fall fee payment deadline: august 16, 2013!

Valencia Foundation

The 2013-14 fall fee payment deadline is vastly approaching!

Term charges and payments are due by August 16, 2013 in order remain enrolled in your fall classes.

If you haven’t already, there’s still time to apply for 2013-14 Valencia Foundation scholarships! 

The Valencia Foundation offers a number of privately funded scholarships that are donated by organizations and individuals interested in supporting Valencia’s students.

By completing one scholarship application, our foundation will then try to match you to any of our scholarships to which you qualify for. Per review & donor confirmation, should you receive a scholarship, thank you note submissions are required as a the final steps in awarding students Valencia Foundation scholarships.

Our application is available yearlong for the 2013-14 academic year. Scholarship funding is awarded as they come in to the first set of applicants that qualify for them.

Apply today for your chance to earn a Foundation scholarship!

Most scholarships offered through the Valencia Foundation require a student to demonstrate need by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Valencia encourages all students to complete the FAFSA early each year and has a priority deadline of November 15th for the upcoming academic year. To complete your FAFSA application, visit: http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/

 *In order to complete the 2013-14 Valencia Foundation scholarship application, visit: http://valenciacollege.edu/finaid/Scholarship_bulletin.cfm

*For more information on Valencia College’s important dates and deadlines, visit the Business Office’s website at: http://valenciacollege.edu/businessoffice/important-deadlines.cfm

womens executive council 2013 scholarship applications due august 10, 2013! apply today!

Womens Executive Council 2013 scholarship application is now available! 

Throughout the year, Women’s Executive Council (WEC) raises money for Women’s Executive Council’s Scholarship & Endowment Funds Through corporate sponsors and direct donations.  These funds provide scholarships to women attending Valencia Community College, University of Central Florida, Rollins College and Seminole State College of Florida.  Our scholarships have provided a turning point in the lives of the many young women we have embraced. Through our financial support, we have encouraged their personal growth, self-improvement, professional development and leadership skills.  Since 1987, the Women’s Executive Council has awarded $118,600 in scholarship funds to women in Central Florida.

Scholarship Value: $1,972

Deadline: August 10, 2013

Eligibility:

  • Registered for at least 12 credits at University of Central Florida, Rollins College (including Hamilton Holt School evening), Valencia College, or Seminole College. Consideration will be given for academic hours with full-time employment.
  • 3.5 GPA and must be on educational path to a professional degree.

How to Apply:

Mail all required documents to:
WEC Scholarship Committee
P.O. Box 2895
Orlando, Florida 32802

For more information, rules, and requirements, please emailcommunications@wecOrlando.com

building bridges to success

The Valencia College Bridges to Success program is responsible for working with diverse populations to assist with the post-secondary transition from enrollment to graduation.

Students often balance their academic course work, family responsibilities and personal life. Bridges students are provided an educational environment that supports their success and provides academic services, programs of interest and mentoring that benefit this diverse student population.

On July 26, the Bridges to Success mentor program IMAGES (Influential Men Applying Gifts and Employing Strategies) gathered in support of Valencia students: those who are the first in their family to attend college.

These IMAGES members joined the Bridges First One online fundraising team and created their team webpage: http://firstone.kintera.org/bridges

These IMAGES members joined the Bridges online fundraising team and created their First One team webpage: http://firstone.kintera.org/bridges

Bridges to Success at Valencia works with ethnically diverse populations to:

  • assist with post-secondary transition from application to enrollment and graduation
  • assist the college in creating an educational environment that supports the success of these students

For more information on the Bridges to Success program at Valencia College, please contact:

John Stover, Bridges to Success Program Manager
Student Services Building, West Campus
jstover@valenciacollege.edu
1800 S Kirkman Rd., Orlando, FL 32811-2302

spotlight story – donald gibson

Donald Gibson
“I truly try my best to enjoy every single day no matter how tough it gets or how bad it is.” And after meeting Donald Gibson, I can certainly attest to that fact.

Donald currently works at Valencia as a VA certifying official. He helps veterans and dependents of veterans, making sure they are accessing their education benefits and assisting with obstacles that might hinder their educational journeys.

It is a job he eyed when he was a work study student, a position funded through the VA. He found out that his VA benefits would be running out the same month that his supervisor was retiring. He approached his supervisor and told her, “I want your job. How do I get it?” Stunned at first, once she realized he was serious she did everything in her power to teach Donald everything she could. He made the transition and is very proud of the work he does at Valencia and especially proud that he gets to help his fellow veterans.

Donald joined the Marine Corps in order to access the GI Bill and go to college. He was told by his parents at an early age that they were not going to be able to help him finance college. He was good in school but hit some rough spots in high school and education took a second seat to life. At 15 he was responsible for all of his expenses – food, clothing, etc. At 18 he was told that he needed to live on his own, so with 6 months until high school graduation, he found a place of his own and worked to pay for it. Despite all of this, he did manage to graduate high school. Thinking back on that time, Donald says, “I was not necessarily ever anti-school, I was just a teenager trying to juggle a full-time job and going to school full time and it was difficult for me.”

He started attending Valencia, the first in his family to attend college, but soon life happened again. He was not successful at accessing his GI Bill funds and ended up thousands of dollars in debt. He soon found himself unable to continue his education.

Time passed and the Post 9/11 GI Bill was introduced. This version paid the school directly and gave him much needed peace of mind. He applied for benefits and was part of the inaugural group of scholars to attend college using this bill.

And then life dealt another blow. His father was electrocuted by a power line and almost passed away. He moved in with Donald, who not only served as his caregiver, but found himself paying for some of his actual medical care, he estimates $9,000 over two years. During this time, being a care provider and working full time, Donald remained a full-time student and had a 3.8 GPA.

It was a foundation scholarship that helped Donald during another one of life’s troubling moments – a $1,000 scholarship just as his VA benefits were running out. He often wonders if those funds saved him from having to drop out again.

Donald admits that his story may not be typical, and that his first-generation experience has included a lot of struggles. But he recognizes that he is farther along than others, “I’m getting ready to purchase my first home. Even with minimum wage jobs I always made sure that I took care of what I needed to take care of.”

He is able to put things in perspective, and credits Valencia in his life. “One of the biggest things to learn is that if you have goals, you have to understand there is going to be those unknowns that you can’t really plan for, but you have to be able to manipulate and work with them. And that is why I love Valencia so much, as a student and as an employee, because they understand, they truly understand life does happen. And they don’t hold it against you, they actually help you try to manipulate and maneuver those obstacles that get thrown in your way.”

And in his job, he is part of Valencia’s helping hand, providing service to fellow veterans. It is a population that is growing, with more than 2,000 students using VA benefits on an annual basis. Summer enrollment was the highest that he’s ever seen with 900 veterans using their benefits.

When asked how he remains so positive, even in the face of challenges, he shares that he has a good support system. “Me and my mom have an amazing relationship,” he shares. Some may question their relationship based on his strict upbringing, but he shares the truth is actually far different than people may assume. She knew him better than he knew himself and realized that he was the type of person who needed to go out into life and experience things on his own, even hardships. And he also cites his faith with reassuring him that everything happens for a reason and this is God’s plan.

His positive energy is not contained, it spills over to those close to him. He is a mentor to his cousin, who is also a first-generation student and currently attending Valencia. He identifies with the struggle of other first-generation families, struggles they may not have needed to go through if they were able to make more money with a college education.

He also mentors a young man that his aunt and uncle took into their home. The young man’s mother struggled with substance abuse and his aunt and uncle offered a stable and loving environment. Donald will tell you that this young man is “one of those people who has so much potential but doesn’t know how to tap into it.” To make sure this young man realizes that potential, he paid the $35 registration fee for him to go to Valencia and helped him fill out the FAFSA. But the support doesn’t end there: “I will be taking time to walk him through the system, to make it easy for him, so he doesn’t get overwhelmed and lost and confused. He doesn’t have people like that in his life that can help him walk through it because nobody he knows, not one person, has ever been to college.”

After meeting with him, I can definitely say that Donald Gibson is someone you would be grateful to have in your corner. The foundation is in the midst of our First One campaign and I find myself thinking about something Donald said at the very end of our chat. First time in college stories aren’t always about college. Donald’s story certainly shows that, sometimes life happens and how you get through it makes you stronger and wiser than before.

discussion on philanthropy – dr. kathleen plinske

This issue is dedicated to our First One campaign, and a celebration of first-generation students. For this month’s discussion on philanthropy, I am checking in with another first-generation college student, Dr. Kathleen Plinske, campus president at Osceola.
Dr. Plinske

Dr. Plinske had a distinctive high school experience, essentially moving out of home at 14 to attend a public, residential high school in Illinois, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy (IMSA). Growing up, there was always an expectation that she would go to college, and attending that high school was a game changer for her because such a large percentage of the graduating class went on to college. It also instilled in her early the concept of philanthropy and giving back. “When you are a student at the high school, they instill in you that the education you are given is a gift from the people of Illinois and the expectation is that you are going to make a difference in the world and give back for that gift you were given.”

The blessings continued for her as she went on to Indiana University and received a merit-based full scholarship which covered not only tuition, room and board but also undergraduate experiences like study abroad opportunities. She graduated with bachelor degrees in physics and Spanish and got a job at her hometown community college. She immediately started working on her master’s degree in Spanish, and they allowed her teach in the evenings while also working full time. She remembers that being a very neat experience – teaching, being a student and working as college support staff all at one time.

She got her master’s from Roosevelt University in Chicago and started a doctoral program at Pepperdine University in Malibu. It was a hybrid program that required attendance for a week at a time and the rest of the coursework was online. She would save and use her vacation time from work in order to attend classes.

She then progressed through a number of positions at McHenry County College and ultimately ended up serving as interim president, and from there she came to Valencia. But it wasn’t a full stop at Valencia, she continued her educational journey and received her MBA from the University of Florida in December 2012.

Doing all of this as a first-generation student offered a unique set of circumstances. She remembers her first semester, she was convinced she was failing all her courses. She remembers having conversations with her mom, should she drop out? Am I college material? And her mother wanted to help but didn’t know how to advise her, having not been in that position. But her mother gave her some wonderful advice: Just stick it out for this first semester and then we’ll see how you do and go from there. It turns out Dr. Plinske had straight A’s, and continued having straight A’s, she just didn’t have a thermometer to gauge how she was doing.

She brings these experiences to her job at Valencia and it is especially helpful at Osceola, where she cites having a very high percentage of students that are first generation. “I can empathize with what they are going through and I understand the importance of really uplifting them. I understand what they are feeling and what their fears might be and what type of support they might need, and just being understanding of what they are going through and how big a deal it is for them and for their families to be the first ones to go to college.”

Dr. Plinske is a firm believer in the power of scholarships, they open a door to a future that might not be possible. For her, she knows that her life and career path would have been much different had she not been afforded additional opportunities and one opportunity impacts the next, which impacts the next and so on.

And on the subject of first-generation students, she is just as passionate, “A contribution to this campaign that supports scholarships for first-generation students will have long-lasting impact on our world that we might not even be able to imagine.” Supporting the First One campaign helps support a student who one day may cure cancer or be president of the United States, the possibilities are endless. “We don’t know our impact ultimately in the end and I think that is what is so exciting about supporting student scholarships.” Without the catalyzing effect of higher education, these talents could remain untapped and unrealized.

Dr. Plinske made a very generous donation to the campaign, a $1,000 gift in memory of her father. Osceola’s student government president approached her and asked if she would support their First One fundraising team. They were shocked when she said yes. She knew she wanted to make a gift to honor her father and his support. She tells a wonderful story about when she was in high school. Every Friday, after work, he would drive to her high school to pick her up and then drive her back on Sunday. She was so homesick, without those weekends home she may not have made it through school.

On the subject of philanthropy, she believes “that unto whom much is given, much is expected.” It was a philosophy she developed in high school and every day a quote from astronomer Carl Sagan, his words on the wall at school, served as a reminder: IMSA was a gift from the people of Illinois to the human future. So from a very early age, the expectation to give something back to make a real difference in the world was introduced to her. “Each of us has unique gifts that we can share – time, treasure and talent – and it is our responsibility to make the best use of our gifts to make the world a better place.”

Would you like to join Dr. Plinske and support education in our community? You can, through our First One campaign. With this campaign, we are trying to raise $100,000 for first-generation scholarships. 100 percent of every dollar raised will go directly to scholarships and gifts received by Aug. 10 are eligible for a match through a challenge grant, bringing our impact to students to $200,000!

It’s not too late to start your own fundraising team, or you can support another team or make a general donation. Join us today at www.valencia.org/FirstOne

a closer look – a conversation with dr. joyce romano

Dr. Romano and Barbara Shell at the First One kick-off

Dr. Romano and Barbara Shell at the First One kick-off

I learned that Valencia’s vice president of student affairs, Dr. Joyce Romano, was a first-generation student when she spoke at our First One campaign kick-off celebration. After hearing her words, I was interested in learning more. Hers is a first-generation student story set against the women’s movement and the changes of the 70s.

She was a good student in high school and counts herself lucky that she had friends whose families were college oriented because her family was not. Her parents lived very simply, there was no savings account, much less one for college.

Her father was born in 1910 and her mother in 1916. When she was 17, Dr. Romano’s mother told her that a girl didn’t need a college education. And she was right, speaking from her life model – women grew up, got married, had children and did not work outside the home. Looking back, Dr. Romano also thinks that this sentiment was shared because “she felt really bad that she couldn’t pay for it and I had to struggle on my own.”

Dr. Romano started to save for college early, babysitting when she was 12, getting a job at 16, working every summer, sometimes two jobs at a time. She worked very hard and saved every dime. “My friends used to beg me to go out with them but I would tell them no, I already spent my $5 this week.”

She was always a saver and always oriented toward college. She went to college before all the federal financial aid programs were available, so she paid her own way and took out a small loan from her hometown bank. She also had two or three different jobs on campus and feels those were an enrichment part of her education.

She was interested in psychology so she chose that as her major, receiving her bachelor’s degree and going on to receive her master’s in counseling psychology. She then went to the University of Kansas and received her doctorate by the time she was 31.

She was planning on being a therapist, working in community mental health, but a job opportunity changed her plans and set the course for her future. The job was in Residence Life and the men she worked with were extremely inclusive, treating her not as a graduate student, but as a professional. When she finished her master’s degree they offered her a full-time job with the office. And it was in this realm of student affairs and student activities that she built her career.

She came to Valencia as coordinator of student development on West campus. A few years later, then college president Dr. Gianini revamped student services as a result of feedback he got through the 1993 SACS reaccreditation process. She took an interim role in the new organization in 1994. Soon, she championed her own cause and pushed for a job search, with no guarantee she would get the job, and became a college administrator. She was in that position for nine years and when senior administrator Dr. Hooks retired, Dr. Shugart made her interim vice president of student affairs. She went through another search process and after about 9 months, she was named as vice president of student affairs. That was almost ten years ago.

She admits that even when she went to college, she had no idea she would be doing what she is doing now. It brings her back to her first-generation experience, “When you are a first-generation college student, your ideas of what is possible are so limited because you just don’t know what you don’t know.” Even in her career, she admits that it never crossed her mind to be a doctor, engineer, lawyer or pilot.

Part of this view was due to being the first in her family to attend college and part of it was the women’s movement. Dr. Romano went to school when times were changing for women, their roles in life – home and work – were moving toward what we may take for granted today. Dr. Romano admits that she is definitely a product of the women’s movement and the women she met on campus and saw as role models were the real leaders of the movement. These were the days of Betty Friedan, founder and first president of the National Organization for Women, speaking on campus. Dr. Romano recalls her resident assistant when she was a freshman. She would get everyone together to go to speeches or programs, either on her campus or at nearby Cornell University. People were acknowledging barriers and having conversations about it. The feminist perspective was gaining momentum and was enormously eye-opening. “That’s definitely what my college education gave me,” she says.

Asked why she feels college is so important, Dr. Romano is quick to reply, “It expands your sense of yourself and what is possible. It expands your view of the world and what is in it and what people are in it and what opportunities are in it.”

And she says one thing that students don’t understand when they start, and she didn’t understand, is that it is a process. “Learning is a process. It’s a true development so it is not just a collection of 20 courses that you take to get a degree.” She feels it is much more, following a concept of Gestalt psychology, “that the whole is bigger than the sum of the parts.” It is not an additive process, she shares, more of a multiplying process where you build on experiences that just get bigger and bigger and sets you up to be a curious person in the world.

Dr. Romano did something wonderful during her remarks at our campaign kick-off. She presented foundation president Geraldine with a check to endow the Cliff Romano Scholarship.

She had a few reasons to establish the scholarship and one led back to her dissertation tribute. In it, she wrote that she regrets that her parents did not have the opportunity for a higher education as she did, and that it was simply a matter of the time they were born, it had nothing to do with intellect or curiosity. Indeed, she shares that both her parents were very curious. And her husband’s parents have a similar story. Neither were college educated, although his father went to the community college in his area after he retired and got an associate degree, becoming involved in the theater department. It is an artistic trait that she says runs in her husband’s family. It really is fitting that it is the Cliff Romano Scholarship because they are both first-generation college students. The scholarship also offers a wonderful way to pay tribute to the memory of these four parents, leaving a legacy that will last a lifetime.

She admits that, given the simple way her parents lived their life, she was surprised there was any money to inherit. She felt very strongly that she wanted to take the funds and pay it forward to help people like her parents get an opportunity. She chose Valencia Foundation because she feels that under Geraldine’s leadership, the foundation is humble and focused on serving the students. And she also loved the fact that here, at Valencia, $25,000 can make a remarkable difference in the lives of our students. When people hear or think about philanthropy, they might assume that you have to be a billionaire to be able to do something. But she proves that wrong and says, “It feels pretty good to be able to make a difference in someone’s life.”

And she brings it all back to her first-generation experience and how college changed her world view. Somebody like me could actually establish a scholarship? Dr. Romano proves that yes, someone like her and her good works can have a lasting effect on Valencia students. And she feels that through the scholarship, it is her parents, still giving her opportunity that she never felt that someone like her would ever have.

apply today for the hispanic business council scholarship!

If you haven’t already, there is still time to apply for the Hispanic Business Council Scholarship! Apply today for a chance to receive scholarship funding for the 2013-14 academic year!  

The Hispanic Business Council’s mission is to provide leadership, education, networking and marketing opportunities for Hispanic businesses located in the Central Florida area.

This scholarship was created by the HBC to assist Hispanic business students living in Osceola County. Two full-time scholarships in the amount of $2,000 each and two part-time scholarships in the amount of $1,000 will be awarded for the upcoming 2013-14 year.

Scholarship requirements:

Apply today by completing your 2013-14 Valencia Foundation Scholarship Application.

Additional scholarship details as well as other scholarship opportunities can be found at: http://valenciacollege.edu/finaid/Scholarship_bulletin.cfm

are you a 2012-13 duke energy (formerly progress energy) scholarship recipient?

Duke Energy (formerly Progress Energy)  is boosting access to female students who are pursuing a career in the engineering field.

If you are:

  • Female
  • 19 years or older
  • Currently enrolled in an engineering program, with a 3.0 GPA or higher
  • Live in Orange or Osceola counties
  • Have documented financial need

You may qualify for the 2013-14 Duke Energy Scholarship.

This scholarship awards $4,275 annually for 2 years at Valencia and 2 years at UCF!

The Duke Energy Scholarship is renewable! If you were awarded the Duke  Energy (formerly Progress Energy) Scholarship in the 2012-13 academic year, you may qualify for a scholarship renewal. You must meet all original requirements and be enrolled full time in an engineering-degree seeking program.

In order to apply, visit: https://valencia.scholarships.ngwebsolutions.com/CMXAdmin/Cmx_Content.aspx?cpId=466 and submit your 2013-14 Valencia Foundation Scholarship Application.

Your Valencia Foundation Scholarship Application may also be considered for any additional scholarships to which you may qualify for. These scholarship selections are based on donor discretion.

In order to renew your scholarship, please contact Jen Bhagirath at (407) 582-3154 or via email at: jbhagirath@valenciacollege.edu in order to obtain further information on the scholarship renewal process.

For additional information, please visit the Valencia College – Scholarship Bulletin Board at: http://valenciacollege.edu/finaid/Scholarship_bulletin.cfm

support first generation in college students

Have you pledged your support to our First One campaign? With a deadline of Aug. 10, we are trying to raise $100,000 for first-generation student scholarships.

Life is a celebration of firsts, and through this campaign, you can give a first that lasts a lifetime – being the first in the family to attend college.

Please join us today at www.valencia.org/FirstOne

13FOU002-first-one-inforgraphic-B-v3-final

faculty and staff giving committee award 5 student scholarships

Valencia’s Student Opportunity Circle Scholarship — the first scholarship created solely with donations from faculty and staff —  awards 5 student scholarships for academic year 2013-2014.

Special thanks to Valencia’s faculty and staff committee ambassadors for their work diligently screening and reviewing scholarship applications from deserving students.

This scholarship is the direct result of Valencia’s annual Faculty and Staff Giving Campaign, designed by a team of Valencia faculty and staff.

Valencia Faculty and Staff campaign ambassadors offer their support of First One.  Valencia established the First One campaign to help first generation college students, those that are first in their families to attend college.

Valencia Faculty and Staff campaign ambassadors offer their support of First One. Valencia Foundation established the First One campaign to help first generation students, those that are first in their families to attend college, with scholarship support.

At the quarterly meeting on July 19th, the faculty and staff committee ambassadors also committed their individual time and resources in support of Valencia’s First One campaign.

Valencia Foundation launched First One as a fund-raising effort to help first-generation, low-income students pursue a college education.

The First One campaign provides the opportunity to give another first by helping a student go to college. For more information on First One please visit: http://www.VALENCIA.org/FirstONE

For more information on Valencia’s faculty and staff committee please visit: http://www.valencia.org/fsg/committee.cfm

The First One campaign takes advantage of Florida’s First Generation Matching Grant Program that maximizes state dollars for students through a dollar-for-dollar match of private contributions. During the 2011-12 school year, more than 29,000 Valencia students were the first in their families to go to college.

online fundraising campaign for first generation scholars

In whatever way you are able to pitch in, we are grateful. The students you serve are grateful. The deserving First Ones will be ecstatic.

In whatever way you are able to pitch in, we are grateful.
The students Valencia serves are grateful.
The deserving First Ones will be ecstatic.

Were you the first person in your family to attend college? If so, we’d like to hear your story and share it as an inspiration for our students and our donors.

Valencia has launched its first online fundraising campaign called First One. This short-term grassroots effort is spearheaded by faculty, staff, students, alumni and other community supporters.

We’re looking to gather $100,000 from our friends, which, quite frankly, is an ambitious initial effort. But think about the impact your efforts will have on individual lives!

Gifts raised by August 31, 2013 are doubled by a matching grant! This means that once we reach our fundraising goal, we’ll be able to provide $200,000 in scholarships to deserving students who are among the first ones in their families to attend college.
Here’s how you can play an important part:

• Share your story! Please email a few paragraphs to jwileden@valenciacollege.edu.

• If you use social media, please temporarily change your avatar to one of our nifty First One pictures, which you will find here. (Your friends will ask questions.)

• We welcome your gift, which can be made by credit card by clicking here.

• To make a donation by check, please send it to: Valencia Foundation at DTC-1 with First One in the memo line. We’ll be sure it counts toward the online campaign and that it is matched.

• To amplify your reach and impact, consider creating a team you can manage at WWW.VALENCIA.ORG/FirstOne. If, for example, you have nine other team members and each raises $250, your impact will be $2,500 x 2 = $5,000 for scholarships!

• If you’d rather use your mad social media skills to spread the word about the First One campaign far and wide, please click here.

• Visit WWW.VALENCIA.ORG/FirstOne to start a team or make a donation today. For more information on the campaign, contact Donna Marino  at dmarino@valenciacollege.edu or Barbara Shell bshell@valenciacollege.edu or call 407-582-3150.

In whatever way you are able to pitch in, we are grateful. The students you serve are grateful. The deserving First Ones will be ecstatic.

Through this campaign – and every day on campus – you are transforming lives and families.

Thank you.

Geraldine

Geraldine Gallagher, CFRE

President and CEO

Valencia College Foundation

valencia alumni news

 

IMG00172-20110705-1807

Nursing alum Richard Gerber ’74 is currently serving as a consultant to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  He would love to hear from fellow classmates from the class of 1974!  Richard celebrated the birth of his first born grandson, Hudson and he and his wife, Valerie, celebrated an amazing 37 years of marriage. Now if that wasn’t enough good news, he and his son have started a courier business called AllPoints Courier Express, specializing in medical courier deliveries. Check out their website: www.allpointscourierexpress.com

Wow! Congratulations Richard

the m. overstreet hospitality and tourism scholarship is available for the 2013-14 academic year! apply today!

Valencia Foundation

Are you currently enrolled in Valencia’s Hospitality and Tourism program?

Apply today for the M. Overstreet Hospitality Scholarship! 

Qualifying candidates must: 

  • Successfully complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) found here: http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/
  • Maintain a 2.5 GPA or higher
  • Enrolled in Valencias Hospitality and Tourism or Tourism Management program
  • Complete a 2013-14 Valencia Foundation Scholarship application  
  • Be enrolled in 3 credit hours or more
  • Be active participants in extracurricular activities 

If you qualify, apply today by completing the 2013-14 Valencia Foundation Scholarship application found here: https://valencia.scholarships.ngwebsolutions.com/CMXAdmin/Cmx_Content.aspx?cpId=466

apply today for the hispanic business council scholarship!

If you haven’t already, there is still time to apply for the Hispanic Business Council Scholarship! Apply today for a chance to receive scholarship funding for the 2013-14 academic year!  

The Hispanic Business Council’s mission is to provide leadership, education, networking and marketing opportunities for Hispanic businesses located in the Central Florida area.

This scholarship was created by the HBC to assist Hispanic business students living in Osceola County. Two full-time scholarships in the amount of $2,000 each and two part-time scholarships in the amount of $1,000 will be awarded for the upcoming 2013-14 year.

Scholarship requirements:

Apply today by completing your 2013-14 Valencia Foundation Scholarship Application.

Additional scholarship details as well as other scholarship opportunities can be found at: http://valenciacollege.edu/finaid/Scholarship_bulletin.cfm

first one campaign kick-off

Last Wednesday, the foundation kicked off our First One campaign. The First One campaign is a six-week online campaign that hopes to raise $100,000 in scholarships for first generation college students. These students are the first in their family to attend college, and the campaign itself is a celebration of firsts – those special memories that help shape who we are today. For more information on the campaign, please visit http://www.Valencia.org/FirstOne.

a first that will last a lifetime

Now, you have the opportunity to help someone else have a first that will last a lifetime — becoming the first person in their family to go to college. And, with dollar-to-dollar matching on donations, you can make twice the impact.

First One Donate

Valencia established the First One campaign to help first generation college students, those that are first in their families to attend college.

The First One campaign provides the opportunity to give another first by helping a student go to college. – See more at: http://www.VALENCIA.org/FirstONE

first one efforts support first generation college students

New Campaign Seeks to Raise Scholarships for First-Generation College Students – by Carol Traynor

Valencia Foundation has launched a fund-raising effort to help first-generation, low-income students pursue a college education. The “First One” campaign takes advantage of Florida’s First Generation Matching Grant Program that maximizes state dollars for students through a dollar-for-dollar match of private contributions.

First One Kickoff

To share your “first” or show your support through a donation, go to http://www.VALENCIA.org/FirstONE or http://facebook.com/myvalenciafoundation

“For first-generation students, a college degree not only transforms their lives, but alters the trajectory of their families for generations to come,” said Geraldine Gallagher, Foundation president and CEO.

During the 2011-12 school year, more than 29,000 Valencia students were the first in their families to go to college.

The campaign, which lasts from July 1 to August 9, seeks to raise $100,000 in private donations with a $100,000 state match. Students who qualify will be eligible for a scholarship of up to $2,000 to help offset the costs associated with college, including tuition, books and supplies, that cannot always be met with state or federal aid alone.

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First-generation student and Valencia graduate Donald Gibson shared that he was the first person in his family to graduate from high school, not just college.

At a kick-off event held yesterday, first-generation student Donald Gibson, 31, told the crowd assembled that he was the first person in his family to graduate from high school, not just college. After graduating from Poinciana High in 2000, he spent five years in the military and later enrolled in college.

“I got my first-generation scholarship right as my GI Bill was running out. If it weren’t for that, I probably would have had to drop out my last semester,” Gibson said.

Finances are just one of the obstacles many first-generation students face. Joyce Romano, Valencia’s vice president of Student Affairs, shared the story of a student she met who drove to Valencia’s Osceola Campus six times before she could muster the courage to get out of her car, go inside the building and apply.

Romano herself was the first in her family to go to college. “I didn’t think of law school. I didn’t think of being a doctor. I didn’t think of owning a business. I didn’t think people like me did such a thing,” she said. “That’s another restraint for people who are first-

generation: they don’t know what things are possible.”

The First One campaign makes use of social media and peer-to-peer outreach and invites others to share how they were the first one to do “something.”

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Available state funds are contingent upon matching contributions from private sources on a one to one dollar basis.

The First Generation Matching Grant Program (FGMG) is a need-based grant program available to degree-seeking, resident, undergraduate students who demonstrate substantial financial need, are enrolled at Valencia College, and whose parents have not earned baccalaureate or higher degrees.

Available state funds are contingent upon matching contributions from private sources on a one to one dollar basis.

To share your “first” or show your support of first-generation students through a donation, go to http://valencia.org/firstone/first-one.cfm or http://facebook.com/myvalenciafoundation

valencia east campus president joins united arts board

By Matthew J. Palm, Orlando Sentinel Arts Writer

I’ve written a lot this year about the various funding and policy changes at United Arts of Central Florida, the umbrella organization that supports more than 50 Central Florida arts and cultural groups.

At its annual meeting this summer, United Arts introduced seven new community and philanthropic leaders to its board of directors — the folks who ultimately decide and sign off on United Arts policies.

“I am thrilled with the wide ranging expertise and leadership brought to United Arts by our new board members,” said Flora Maria Garcia, United Arts president and CEO. “While the overall environment remains challenging for our artistic community, these talented individuals will be welcome additions to our arts-committed and engaged board.”

 Here are brief biographies of the new board members, provided by United Arts. The bios are followed by a list of the board of directors officers. Linda Landman Gonzalez, the Orlando Magic’s vice president of community relations and government affairs, remains as president.

The seven new board members are:

Edward Hensley, co-founder of AssistRX, Inc. Hensley has spent his career in the health-care industry working to improve people’s quality of life. His experience features leadership roles in specialty pharmaceutical corporations including the 2005 launch of Advanced Care Scripts Inc. now a unit of Omnicare, a Fortune 500 Company. His latest venture, AssistRX, Inc., provides state of the art technology to the biotech and pharmaceutical industry and their prescribers. In 2009, Hensley co-founded The Assistance Fund, a nonprofit committed to ensuring that no one goes without needed medications due to an inability to pay. Since its founding, the Assistance Fund has provided more than $146 million in grants to the needy across the United States and Puerto Rico.

DrStaceyJohnsonStacey R. Johnson, Campus President, East and Winter Park Campuses, Valencia College. With more than 30 years of experience in higher education and 20 years of direct institutional administrative experience, Johnson was named Campus President for East Campus, known as the Arts & Entertainment Campus, and Winter Park Campus in 2012. Johnson is also a past member of the United States Olympic team (1980) and the U.S. Olympic Committee’s Executive Committee (2000-2004) as well as the first woman to hold a four-year term as President of U.S. Fencing’s National Governing Body. She has been awarded the Congressional Gold Medial of Achievement and the NCAA Silver Anniversary Award and has been inducted into the San Antonio Women’s, San Jose State University, San Antonio Sports and U.S. Fencing Halls of Fame.

Jennifer McCarthy, FACHE, Chief Operating Officer for Dr. P. Phillips Hospital, a full-service medical and surgical facility of Orlando Health. With more than 20 years of healthcare experience, McCarthy currently oversees all operational aspects of the hospital. In addition, she has served on the boards of many community and professional organizations including the American College of Healthcare Executives, the Council of 100 at the Brevard Art Center and Museum, the Women’s Center Guild and the Central Florida American College of Healthcare Executives.

Christine Moore, current Chair of the Orange County School Board Communications Committee, member of the Legislative Committee and member of the Board of Directors for the Florida School Boards Association. Committed to the preservation of fine-arts education in our schools, Moore is a University of Michigan cum laude graduate in Music Education and Performance. She has performed with the Brevard Symphony Orchestra, Bach Festival Orchestra and the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra. Moore is the founder of a multi-media public relations firm and serves with area civic organizations, including the Orange County Charter Review Commission, Citizen’s Review Panel and Children’s First Scholarship Organization.

Penelope B. Perez-Kelly, of Counsel, McClane Partners. Perez-Kelly’s practice centers on trademarks, copyrights, immigration, commercial litigation and international business law. Board Certified in International Law from the Florida Bar in 2012 she is an alumna of the University of Miami and University of Florida College of Law. Perez-Kelly was awarded the Orange County Bar Association’s Lawrence G. Matthews Jr. Young Lawyer Professionalism Award in 2011 and is a member of the Florida Bar International Law Section Executive Council and the Hispanic Bar Association of Central Florida, where she served as president in 2007.

Jennifer Quigley, founding principal of WBQ Design & Engineering, Inc., a civil-engineering firm located in Downtown Orlando. As the Chairwoman of See Art Orlando, Quigley is overseeing the acquisition and installation of eight outdoor sculptures in downtown Orlando this fall. A longtime member and past chair for the Downtown Development Board and the Community Redevelopment Agency, Quigley is the outgoing Chair of the Orange County Cultural Arts Advisory Council and a member of the Orange County Public Art Review Board. Quigley and her fiancé own the Gallery at Avalon Island, and are sponsors of the Kiene/Quigley Gallery at CityArts Factory.

Kate Wilson, Vice President, Community Affairs Officer – Central Florida Government and Community Relations Group, Wells Fargo. With more than 15 years of professional experience in community relations, reputation management and strategic communication, Wilson works to uphold and promote Wells Fargo’s reputation in the community and manages philanthropy – community investments and volunteerism – across 14 countries. A native of Central Florida returning to Orlando after a lengthy stint in Boston, Mass., Wilson currently mentors students in the Read2Success Program, is a member of Leadership Orlando’s Class 85 and has served as a board member of Boston’s Children’s Chorus, an overseer for Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston, and chairperson for the Boston Givers Group.

Now, here are the board of director’s officers for the next year:

Linda Landman Gonzalez, Chair

Bob McAdam, Vice Chair

Jean Nowry, Treasurer

Jennifer Quigley, Secretary

Christopher M. McCann, Chair, Audit & Finance

Scott E. Bowman, Chair, Development

Tony Jenkins, Chair, Nominating

Martha Hartley, Chair, Standards & Allocations

the 2013-14 retired air force, marine, army, navy (rafman) club scholarship now available!

The RAFMAN (Retired Air Force, Marine, Army, Navy) Club Scholarship is currently seeking a High School Graduate and resident of Orange and Seminole Counties

Applicants must also meet these additional requirements:

  • Submit a complete FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid)
  • Must be enrolled Full-Time or Part-Time
  • Active in African American Student Association and Community Service
  • Completed High School with 2.5 or higher GPA
  • Demonstrate Financial Need
  • Graduates of Jones, Evans or Edgewater high school.

In order to apply for this scholarship, please visit https://valencia.scholarships.ngwebsolutions.com/CMXAdmin/Cmx_Content.aspx?cpId=466 and complete the 2013-14 Valencia Foundation scholarship application today!

the m. overstreet hospitality and tourism scholarship is available for the 2013-14 academic year! apply today!

Valencia Foundation

Are you currently enrolled in Valencia’s Hospitality and Tourism program?

Apply today for the M. Overstreet Hospitality Scholarship! 

Qualifying candidates must: 

  • Successfully complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) found here: http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/
  • Maintain a 2.5 GPA or higher
  • Enrolled in Valencias Hospitality and Tourism or Tourism Management program
  • Complete a 2013-14 Valencia Foundation Scholarship application  
  • Be enrolled in 3 credit hours or more
  • Be active participants in extracurricular activities 

If you qualify, apply today by completing the 2013-14 Valencia Foundation Scholarship application found here: https://valencia.scholarships.ngwebsolutions.com/CMXAdmin/Cmx_Content.aspx?cpId=466

 

 

 

are you a 2012-13 duke energy (formerly progress energy) scholarship recipient?

Duke Energy (formerly Progress Energy)  is boosting access to female students who are pursuing a career in the engineering field.

If you are:

  • Female
  • 19 years or older
  • Currently enrolled in an engineering program, with a 3.0 GPA or higher
  • Live in Orange or Osceola counties
  • Have documented financial need

You may qualify for the 2013-14 Duke Energy Scholarship.

This scholarship awards $4,275 annually for 2 years at Valencia and 2 years at UCF!

The Duke Energy Scholarship is renewable! If you were awarded the Duke  Energy (formerly Progress Energy) Scholarship in the 2012-13 academic year, you may qualify for a scholarship renewal. You must meet all original requirements and be enrolled full time in an engineering-degree seeking program.

In order to apply, visit: https://valencia.scholarships.ngwebsolutions.com/CMXAdmin/Cmx_Content.aspx?cpId=466 and submit your 2013-14 Valencia Foundation Scholarship Application.

Your Valencia Foundation Scholarship Application may also be considered for any additional scholarships to which you may qualify for. These scholarship selections are based on donor discretion.

In order to renew your scholarship, please contact Jen Bhagirath at (407) 582-3154 or via email at: jbhagirath@valenciacollege.edu in order to obtain further information on the scholarship renewal process.

For additional information, please visit the Valencia College – Scholarship Bulletin Board at: http://valenciacollege.edu/finaid/Scholarship_bulletin.cfm

join us for our campaign kick off

first-one-avatars-22Do you have plans for this Wednesday? Now you do! Join us as we celebrate firsts and kick off our First One campaign.

First One Campaign Kick Off Reception
Wednesday, July 10, 5:30 p.m to 7:30 p.m.
Valencia College Criminal Justice Institute
8600 Valencia College Lane
Orlando, FL 32825

Enjoy food, fun and fellowship as we embark on the First One campaign in support of first-generation student scholarships.

The campaign runs through August 10. During that time, we are asking participants to share their firsts, a memory about a special first and how it impacted your life. #FirstOne

To RSVP for the reception, please call 407-582-3180. For more information about the First One campaign, visit http://www.valencia.org/FirstOne.

share your first …. help someone become a first

Your first day of college, your first road trip or your first born -- show your story with a First ONE profile picture and help spread the word on Facebook, or use one as an avatar wherever you share. http://valencia.org/firstone/first-one.cfm

One’s life is full of firsts — first steps, first day of school, first car, first kiss. They only happen once, yet they stay with you forever. Now, you have the opportunity to help someone else have a first that will last a lifetime — becoming the first person in their family to go to college. And, with dollar-to-dollar matching on donations, you can make twice the impact.

 tell-your-story

Show your support with a First ONE profile picture.

Your first day of college, your first road trip or your first born — show your story with a First ONE profile picture and help spread the word on Facebook, or use one as an avatar on Twitter, WordPress or wherever you share.

Download an avatar — right click and select “save image as” on a picture below.

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first-one-avatars-13first-one-avatars-7first-one-avatars-8first-one-avatars-20first-one-avatars-17foundation-first-one-wordmark-4c-stacked-print

apply today for the 2013-2014 hispanic business council scholarship!

If you haven’t already, there is still time to apply for the Hispanic Business Council Scholarship! Apply today for a chance to receive scholarship funding for the 2013-14 academic year!  

The Hispanic Business Council’s mission is to provide leadership, education, networking and marketing opportunities for Hispanic businesses located in the Central Florida area.

This scholarship was created by the HBC to assist Hispanic business students living in Osceola County. Two full-time scholarships in the amount of $2,000 each and two part-time scholarships in the amount of $1,000 will be awarded for the upcoming 2013-14 year.

Scholarship requirements:

Apply today by completing your 2013-14 Valencia Foundation Scholarship Application.

Additional scholarship details as well as other scholarship opportunities can be found at: http://valenciacollege.edu/finaid/Scholarship_bulletin.cfm

women’s executive council scholarship opportunity!

Womens Executive Council 2013 scholarship application is now available! 

Throughout the year, Women’s Executive Council (WEC) raises money for Women’s Executive Council’s Scholarship & Endowment Funds Through corporate sponsors and direct donations.  These funds provide scholarships to women attending Valencia Community College, University of Central Florida, Rollins College and Seminole State College of Florida.  Our scholarships have provided a turning point in the lives of the many young women we have embraced. Through our financial support, we have encouraged their personal growth, self-improvement, professional development and leadership skills.  Since 1987, the Women’s Executive Council has awarded $118,600 in scholarship funds to women in Central Florida.

Scholarship Value: $1,972

Deadline: August 10, 2013

Eligibility:

  • Registered for at least 12 credits at University of Central Florida, Rollins College (including Hamilton Holt School evening), Valencia College, or Seminole College. Consideration will be given for academic hours with full-time employment.
  • 3.5 GPA and must be on educational path to a professional degree.

How to Apply:

Mail all required documents to:
WEC Scholarship Committee
P.O. Box 2895
Orlando, Florida 32802

For more information, rules, and requirements, please emailcommunications@wecOrlando.com

are you a 2012-13 duke energy (formerly progress energy) scholarship recipient?

Duke Energy (formerly Progress Energy)  is boosting access to female students who are pursuing a career in the engineering field.

If you are:

  • Female
  • 19 years or older
  • Currently enrolled in an engineering program, with a 3.0 GPA or higher
  • Live in Orange or Osceola counties
  • Have documented financial need

You may qualify for the 2013-14 Duke Energy Scholarship.

This scholarship awards $4,275 annually for 2 years at Valencia and 2 years at UCF!

The Duke Energy Scholarship is renewable! If you were awarded the Duke  Energy (formerly Progress Energy) Scholarship in the 2012-13 academic year, you may qualify for a scholarship renewal. You must meet all original requirements and be enrolled full time in an engineering-degree seeking program.

In order to apply, visit: https://valencia.scholarships.ngwebsolutions.com/CMXAdmin/Cmx_Content.aspx?cpId=466 and submit your 2013-14 Valencia Foundation Scholarship Application.

Your Valencia Foundation Scholarship Application may also be considered for any additional scholarships to which you may qualify for. These scholarship selections are based on donor discretion.

In order to renew your scholarship, please contact Jen Bhagirath at (407) 582-3154 or via email at: jbhagirath@valenciacollege.edu in order to obtain further information on the scholarship renewal process.

For additional information, please visit the Valencia College – Scholarship Bulletin Board at: http://valenciacollege.edu/finaid/Scholarship_bulletin.cfm

spotlight story: valencia launches first ONE campaign

foundation-first-one-wordmark-4c-stacked-printMany people I interview reference their parents and families as role models for higher education. Their parents went to college and they followed in their footsteps. But what if you didn’t have that? What would you do? Would you have enough courage to start down that path alone? Would you have enough motivation and faith to overcome obstacles?

Last year, more than 29,000 Valencia students did just that, they were the first in their families to attend college. These students are their own role model and work hard every day to change the trajectory of their family for generations to come.

To help these students, Valencia has launched the first ONE campaign. This is a six-week online effort to raise $100,000 for first generation student scholarships. 100 percent of the funds raised will go directly to support these scholarships, and each donation is eligible for a dollar to dollar match.

Each student story is unique but there is some commonality among first generation students. Often, they report that they watched their parent(s) struggle, not having a postsecondary education. And for each there is a mention of pride, pride they have for their accomplishment and the pride that they feel from their families being the first to attend college.

Natacha suffered a great tragedy, she lost her parents. That caused her to choose a career in the healthcare field. She wants to be a doctor to save people because she doesn’t want others to feel the way that she feels, not having those she loves and cherishes there to cheer on her accomplishments.

Samantha’s parents didn’t go to college, but they instilled in her the importance of education and greatly influenced her decision to become a nurse. She wants to give back to her parents and make them proud.

Alexander watched someone close to him struggle with cocaine addiction and since then he has always been anti-drug. He plans to finish his AS degree in criminal justice and attend the police academy.

Bianca’s dad was her only parent growing up and he never got past middle school. She shares that although he lacks a higher education, he is intelligent, gaining his accomplishments through hard work, and he taught her not to take any of life’s experiences for granted. She has been accepted to Valencia’s nursing program and recently got a job in the field.

Sequilla wants to get her AS in accounting and then move on to get a bachelor’s degree in business. She finds that going to school and being committed to her goals has had a ripple effect on her ten-year-old son. He has gone from a C student to straight A’s.

Isaias did some soul-searching and decided he would like to pursue a career in medical administration. He realized that a higher education would afford him more opportunities and a chance for a career.

Taisha remembers a childhood of poverty, addiction and welfare. As an adolescent she found herself in homeless shelters twice. When she became a mother she got serious about her education, determined to break the cycle of poverty and give her children a cherished childhood. Taisha is completing all of her pre-requisites and hopes to be accepted into Valencia’s sonography program.

Edith started a company with her husband but the economic downturn hit the business hard. She realizes that the job market has become much more competitive and most employers now require some sort of degree. She is at Valencia pursuing a degree in computer programming and analysis.

These stories represent the students that will benefit from the first ONE campaign. This online campaign will be a new venture for the foundation and we invite you to embark on this journey with us. Visit www.valencia.org/firstONE for more information.

If you are interested in leading a fundraising team, please contact Donna Marino, CFRE, at 407-582-3128, or Barbara Shell at 407-582-3219.

discussion on philanthropy

This month I am turning the keyboard over to scholarship recipient Angela Bardwell-Owens. She shares with us her definition of philanthropy and explains the importance of scholarships.

Angela Bardwell OwensEasily defined as an inclination to increase the well-being of humankind, usually through monetary donations, philanthropy is more than just a financial endeavor. Philanthropy begins from a frame of mind that sometimes, people need a little assistance. This benevolence extends into donations of services or self as well.

As a sophomore studying psychological sciences, I am exposed to numerous theories and abstract ways of thinking. I am often asked why I stay after class or stay up late to help classmates with class materials. My reply is always the same, “I am able to do the right thing by offering myself as a service to students who are struggling, because someone else has offered their assistance to me.”

I have been the fortunate recipient of nine scholarships since my arrival at Valencia in the fall of 2011. These scholarships have alleviated some of the financial burden I have placed myself and my family under for the pursuit of higher education.

My dream is to lead my own lab as a research scientist creating new research, overseeing graduate student research, undergraduate activities, managing multiple projects and continuing to provide leadership to institutional and community organizations.

I am active in several student organizations on campus, in the community, as well as interning at a research lab at UCF. The philanthropists who have generously offered funding to scholarships inspired me long ago to give something of myself to Valencia College. The act of giving is philanthropy, in which I am able to give my assistance to anyone who needs it.

Scholarships have made a significant impact on me financially, which I have now transformed into service to my college. I will continue to offer my late nights for student services until I am financially able to increase the well-being of humankind, specifically the student scholarships at Valencia College. Without having received scholarships through Valencia Foundation, I may not have had as many opportunities to give myself in service to others, who sometimes, need a little assistance.

first ONE campaign, a celebration of firsts

Collin Jones52_CC-resizeSince the first ONE campaign is a celebration of firsts, I thought it would be fun to see what special firsts we remember here at the foundation office.

Here is mine: I remember my first day of college at UCF. I remember the tape that was in the tape deck of my very well-worn Pontiac Sunbird and I remember I was wearing a brand new pair of sandals. My classes were spread across campus and I remember I got the worst blisters from those sandals!

Here is a favorite first memory from our coordinator of foundation accounts, Vanessa de la Paz-Ramos: I remember the first time I laid my eyes on my nephew after he was born. He was so tiny, with legs that looked like that of a frog, but a cutie-patootie all at the same time. It was right at that moment that I realized how his presence as our very own little prince made our little family complete.

And from our scholarship coordinator, Jennifer Bhagirath: I’ll never forget winning my first award, the “Writing Wizard” ribbon for our school’s fifth-grade creative writing competition. Writing about what I believed happened when our community recycled, my composition included everything from talking recycling bins to singing whales so overjoyed by our efforts to keep our environment clean. It was this experience that set motion to my love of writing and I have been captivated by it ever since.

Our donor stewardship manager, Donna Marino, CFRE, also had a well-worn first car, a Datsun 310 hatchback, nicknamed “Skip” because he stalled and skipped until she got the handle of driving stick: I remember the first time I popped a clutch going backwards (forwards was pretty much all the time as the key didn’t work properly). It was on Valencia’s East Campus. Back then, there were slopes in the parking area around the trees. Students could park on the hills to keep a car under the shade. I was parked there on a day when my car wouldn’t start. There was no one around to push it forward. I figured popping the clutch should be the same backwards and forwards. I turned the ignition on, let out the clutch, allowed the car to roll back and I started the car, with a “Skip”!

Barbara Shell, alumni relations director, sends along this memory: My first summer alumni relations conference was at Vanderbilt University. My workmates sent me off with a “care package” that included purple flip-flops with polka dots for the community shower room. They were great conversation starters for sure! I am still excited to remember my first private dorm room and my first bunk bed experience during that time.

And Daphne Cooper, alumni relations assistant brings us full circle with a special student scholarship memory: My first Valencia scholarship came from The University Club of Orlando. I was very surprised and honored to be an award recipient. It definitely inspired me to continue my studies here at Valencia and gives me insight today as I currently work with scholarship applicants.

And now it is your turn! Connect with us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/MyValenciaFoundation) and Twitter (@valenciagiving) and share a special “first” memory with us. #firstONE