Elizabeth Wanielista–change is a constant!

The John and Florence MacLeod Chair in Business this year was awarded to Elizabeth Wanielista.

On October 19, 2015, she attended the 27th Annual Professional Association of Health Care Office Management (PAHCOM) Conference in Clearwater Beach, FL.

The benefits derived from this endowed chair were information on the skills needed by medical office employees to obtain employment in medical offices. Students need to be able to apply knowledge of computers but also have soft skills as: proper telephone techniques, compassion, helping attitude, and discretion regarding patient information. Also, noted was the fact that transcription is no longer used in medical offices. The use of Electronic Health Records is becoming mandatory in medical offices, so employees will need to have knowledge of how to input these records.

This information was shared with the other Office & Medical Office Administration faculty. Her attending the PAHCOM Conference and meeting with office managers regarding skills needed for medical office employees were obtained as a result of this endowed chair. Students will benefit from the information received from the conference by the information obtained from medical office managers. The information on the skills needed for medical office employees will be used to update the Medical Office Administration Program.

The ability to have contact with employees working in the field gave her first-hand knowledge. Office Managers are very busy and hard to reach when in their regular work environment. Having been with them for three days gave her the opportunity to ask questions of many different managers regarding the skills needed for medical office employees.

“I have attempted to make contact with local medical office managers which resulted in three face-to-face meetings. I have sent out many emails and made many calls to local office managers with not many results. My attending the Medical Office Manager Conference in October gave me more contacts.

“The medical office is changing as a result of technology and HIPAA laws, so it is important to keep in contact with local managers in order to update our program.”

Check out our earlier piece: http://bit.ly/2lUUoXu

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Andrew Ray: a visit to China

Andrew Ray, traveling to make life better at home. 1m3a0100-%281024x683%29-2

Andrew Ray took his Hubbard Construction Company Chair in Technical and Engineering Programs and went on walk-about this summer. He took two students and combined them with a business program to China in July, to take a look at how China is exploring renewable energy.

Originally, they were going to Germany, but that became an impossibility, so instead of calling it quits, Ray changed his plans, and took his students to China, where just a few years previously, the Chinese—known for renewable energy in the runup to the Beijing Olympics—had blossomed with solar.

In the lead-up to the Beijing trip, they started with a trip to the UCF campus in Cocoa to look at renewable energy.

Once in China, they looked at solar, thermal, and some wind. They looked at wind energy being produced in the Gobi Desert, as well as work being done in Beijing and Shanghai. They also attended lectures at Polytechnic of Shanghai. They also discovered that the air quality is worse in Beijing (despite the cleanliness of the air at the Beijing Olympics!)

China is leading the world in manufacturing solar panels and ranks second in solar energy production, and are by far the leader in wind power. They have also been leading the movement to robotic construction technologies, and 3D printing of buildings. Despite this, they also have a leading role in pollution—a problem still to be solved!

 

James Inglis–going where no man has gone before

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James Inglis, Program Director Hospitality/Restaurant Management, used this year’s Central Florida Hotel and Lodging Association Chair in Hospitality Management to fund his visit—and the visits of 12 students—to the National Hotel show in Chicago this year.

“Attending the national show is amazing: all the new technology, educational seminars and product demo’s are very informative. I gain by keeping up with the latest industry trends and products and the students also gain in the same way.”

It really opens students’ eyes to the current state of the industry and what the future holds, which is very bright, continues Inglis.

One of Inglis’s favorite cooking demos was Chef Rick Bayless, who showed the attendees how to make several basic marinades to keep on hand, and what to use them on.

It wasn’t all fun and games, of course. There were also business-oriented workshops on things like overtime laws, and how to motivate entry- and line-level employees.

They saw a demo on sustainability and how to purchase products within a 50 mile radius oimg_0106-1f your location.

Lots of new product demos were going on during the show, and the new img_0168-1technology of tablets and new ordering systems being introduced into the quick service and fast casual dining segments.

They even saw a robot cooking food. No word on the improvements to dining at the space station.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steven Cunningham, professor of English as a second language: language as art

The idea for Steven Cunningham’s endowed chair project to bring Brazilian artist Clovis Junior to work with students inimg_4494 an elementary school was inspired by Cunningham’s campus president, Dr. Kathleen Plinske. Dr. Plinske forged a partnership between the Osceola Campus and Central Avenue Elementary School about two years ago when she was asked if Valencia could send some students to volunteer as tutors. “We were told that the biggest need of the elementary school students was just to have someone who cares about them. As a professor of English as a Second Language, I was aware that Central Avenue had many students from many different cultures who did not speak English as their native language. I thought, what better way to boost self-esteem than to connect them to a successful artist from another country? At the same time, we could stimulate creativity and provide affirmation of the wonderful diversity in their classrooms.”

When he contacted the school to see if they would be interested in the project, they were very interested and informed him that this particular elementary school just had its art program reinstated that year! Cunningham sent the art teacher some information on the artist and his art.

When they aimg_4482rrived on the appointed day, one of the students couldn’t hold in his excitement and shouted, “It’s the famous artist from Brazil!” Clovis worked with five different art classes throughout the day. First, he talked about his art and taught the kids a few phrases in Portuguese. Then the students created their own paintings as he did a demonstration painting that he left with the school as a keepsake of his visit.

They had each student sign their painting. Clovis signed them too animg_4445d had a picture taken with each student who had a signed photo release. One pupil asked me where she should sign her painting. “I told her, “You are the artist. You can sign it wherever you want.” She responded, “I’m an ARTIST?!?””

It was a very successful project and a fulfilling and rewarding day. “I felt like we had really captured the true intention of the Tupperware Corporation Endowed Chair in Community Quality by investing in the students at Central Avenue Elementary School and making them feel proud of themselves”.”

Andrew Ray, program chair AS built environment programs

1M3A0100 %281024x683%29 (2)Professor Ray is using the Hubbard Construction Company Chair in Technical and Engineering Program for study abroad scholarships.

The Hubbard Construction Chair supports educational programs in building construction, drafting and design, land surveying, and other technology areas. These funds will provide scholarships to allow students in the above programs to participate in a study abroad trip to visit renewable energy facilities in China during summer, 2016. Professor Ray also plan to escort students to Germany/Switzerland in 2016, but the opportunity arose to join Jennifer Robertson’s business students on a 10 day trip to Beijing and Shanghai in July, 2016, to see renewable energy production and accelerated/automated construction techniques.

 “My personal interest in sustainable energy production, including solar, wind and geo-thermal power, spans almost 40 years; the thesis for my Master of Architecture involved creating software and graphics to analyze energy usage in historic buildings.”

The sabbatical Professor Ray completed during fall semester, 2015, included visits to all cities along the path of the proposed trip that Professor Deymond Hoyte and he plan to lead in summer, 2017. “This ‘dry-run’ allowed me to research each site, obtain tourist maps and be able to provide background information to students before and during the study abroad trip.”

The sabbatical itinerary through 29 countries also included visits to a solar plant east of Berlin, geothermal springs and sustainable indoor greenhouses in Iceland, as well as many stops to document various solar and wind power facilities wherever accessible.

Pre-trip meetings with students will focus on popular forms of renewable energy (photovoltaic and thermal solar, wind, geo-thermal, and biofuels), the sociopolitical support of renewables by some governments within the European Union and China, with background on the specific sites they will visit. This will also include an introduction to the culture and people of China for the 2016 trip, and Germany and Switzerland for 2017, and basic language phrases. Since the trip will include students in Built Environment programs and also students taking business courses at Valencia, the cross-discipline approach should foster unique perspectives and discussions. Assessments will include journals and reflection papers on the projects visited and insight gained from the cultural experience.

Study abroad experiences are life-changing for students, opening them to global perspectives, and providing insight into alternate solutions to systemic issues. Most students in the Built Environment program have previously undertaken research on issues related to sustainability, completing an oral presentation on a “green” topic to their classmates. Report topics include the alternate power generation methods and current construction practices featured on this trip, but also include garden roofs; this is the major amenity of an apartment building they will visit in Darmstadt with the students. In addition, students will be exposed to state-of-the-art technologies used in China and Europe, as well as traditional construction techniques predating anything built in the USA.

Professor Ray has been involved in the Central Florida design and construction community for many years. After graduating with a Master’s in Architecture from Texas A&M, he moved to Fort Myers, FL, and was involved with historic preservation and commercial projects while completing his internship. Upon becoming a registered architect, he moved his family to Orlando in 1990, founded Array Design and started teaching at Valencia in 1991. A past president of the local chapter of the Construction Specifications Institute, and former Construction Manager with Habitat for Humanity, Mr. Ray enjoys travel and learning about construction. His wife, Alison, is also an architect, and they have two sons, Alex and Tony.

 

Valencia nursing is extraordinary

First-time exam takers from Valencia College taking the recent round of the NCLEX-RN® (the National Council Licensure Examination) scored big.

4th quarter: 10/01/2015 – 12/31/2015 – 100%

That’s right – 100%.

“In each course throughout the nursing program, students are given standardized exams which are nationally normed. These standardized exams prepare students to take the NCLEX-RN® (the National Council Licensure Examination).”

The standardized exams also allow the faculty to evaluate whether the Nursing Program Outcomes have been met.  After the students graduate, they then take the NCLEX-RN, which is the national licensure exam that all nursing graduates take to become licensed as an RN,” says Anita Kovalsky RN, MNEd, CNE, Valencia’s Clinical Nursing program director.

Passing this exam reflects that the new RN is able to give safe and effective care to patients, as well as function as an entry-Level RN at the patient’s bedside.

And while not to take away from that 100%, the nursing program’s year to date numbers are remarkable as well: 01/01/2015 – 12/31/2015 – 95.2%

 To compare, statewide,

STATE OF FLORIDA – pass-rates

Year to date: 01/01/2015 – 12/31/2015 – 72.02%

 

While across the nation,

NATIONAL – pass-rates

Year to date: 01/01/2015 – 12/31/2015 – 84.51%

 

Congratulations to the students and teachers of Valencia College’s nursing program!

Pamela Sandy, professor of dental hygiene

Another in our series on the endowed chairs.

Pam 2015Pamela Sandy, RDH, BS, MA, professor of dental hygiene and dental hygiene program chair, is using this year’s Ira Vinson Henderson Chair in Nursing and Allied Health grant to revitalize the curriculum and calibrate faculty in the dental hygiene program.

Ms. Sandy participated in the Academy for Academic Leadership’s Institute for Allied Dental Educators with the goal of acquiring the skills of a master educator with the ADEA/AAL Institute for Allied Health Educators. The program is a series of five live online ninety minute sessions, and was attended by  Valencia full-time faculty Robin Poole and Rebekah Pittman;  Valencia adjunct faculty Natasha Cook and Danielle Driscoll;  and Valencia senior lab manager, Tiffany Baggs.

The series she selected was titled “Revitalizing Curriculum and Calibrating Faculty,” which included faculty calibration, creating a flipped classroom, designing hybrid courses, curriculum design, and management.

The AAL goals for this class included

  • Creating a flipped classroom: giving an overview of the flipped classroom, identifying advantages and role of faculty as facilitators and applying the concepts by combining the basic sciences with clinical care, including utilization of evidence-based learning, cases and reflective exercises.
  • Curriculum design and management, discussing curriculum mapping and how mapping relates to student assessment, and comparing curriculum mapping and course sequencing for optimal student success.
  • And, finally, faculty motivation, including team-building and applying motivational techniques to better engage peers in an effort to motivate fellow faculty.

In addition, one of her goals—and two of the goals for the class—was to explore other methods for faculty calibration FDHA 2012(calibration is faculty being on the same “page” during clinical evaluation of students; it is developing and adhering to a set of guidelines for student evaluation) in the clinical setting and to assist faculty in designing hybrid courses which will keep the dental hygiene curriculum current. To that end, two faculty completed another course in community dental health to refresh their skills in teaching the course and to enhance course content.

 Dental hygiene student learning can be positively impacted by faculty who are skilled at using the flipped classroom concept and are competent in designing learning activities in an online environment.”

Most of the faculty have been using the flipped classroom concept for several years, and the course gave them some additional ideas for technologies and learning activities they could use in their classes.

In all, the sessions drove the instructors’ learning and impact on the classroom immensely. “It was,” says Ms. Sandy, “a very successful session.”